Out of Site, Out of Mind

I knew I wanted to write a blog post about how I forgot to change my pod last week, and I knew I wanted to give it some sort of clever title…

…so out of site, out of mind is what I came up with. After all, my pump site was completely out of sight for me, which is one reason why I forgot it.

You’d think that it’d be impossible to forget about the device I have to wear 24/7, but it’s the sort of thing you get used to pretty quickly.

You’d think that after being on the Omnipod for almost 7 years, I’d never forget that I have to change my pod every 3 days. But just like I sometimes forget to reply to a text message or take a load of laundry out of the dryer, it slipped my mind the other night until just before I went to bed.

That’s when I was faced with a choice: Should I change the pod right then and there before I went to sleep, or let it expire overnight and change it first thing in the morning?

There were pros and cons to each. If I changed the pod before bed, then I wouldn’t have to worry about a screaming pod waking me up in the wee hours of the morning (well, I would if it failed, but the chances of that happening were small). But if I waited until the morning, I would ensure that the 30+ units of insulin still left in the pod would get used up as much as possible. It would also mean that I could push back my regular pod change by one whole day, which sounded appealing – until I remembered that it would mean that I’d have to change my pod on a Saturday when I’m double-hosting family, then friends, at my home.

So I sucked it up and changed my pod before going to sleep, knowing that in an hour and a half it would go off to remind me to check my blood sugar (to make sure that the pod was functioning properly), but feeling okay about this because I’d much rather deal with a gentle reminder over an aggressive malfunction alarm.

Now to the whole reason why I decided to share this seemingly insignificant anecdote in the first place: This is just one diabetes-related decision that I had to make on this particular day. I can’t even tell you how many other choices I had to make prior to this concerning which foods I ate, how much insulin I took, when I exercised, when I ate my meals, and so forth.

Diabetes is a disease defined by decisions. Fortunately, this one about when to change my pod was an easier one to make…but unfortunately, there are many others that are much more difficult. And I think all people with diabetes deserve goddamn decision-making trophies because of the funny conundrum of having no choice but to live life by making decisions.

2 thoughts on “Out of Site, Out of Mind

  1. My pump started alarming for the site change and I turned it off of course. I showed up at my doctor’s office the next day with a pump out of insulin. Yeah, Sheryl let it rip.

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  2. The way I view it is that my insulin pump is so incredibly expensive that I’m darn well going to get that extra 8 hours after expiration (unless I’m going to work, then I’ll change it beforehand).

    As for the 30 units? I personally clean the vial my Humalog/Lispro with isopropyl alcohol, wait 10 seconds, puncture the vial and draw X units from provided Omnipod syringe, and then puncture the fill-hole of the old Omnipod and draw out my insulin and put it in my new Omnipod. I know it’s not recommended and isn’t approved, but it pains me to throw away insulin when I know others have died for it.

    As for diabetes being a disease of decisions? Yep… I wholeheartedly agree.

    Liked by 1 person

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