Traveling with T1D: Upon Arrival

Bags packed? Check. Made it to the airport? Check. Boarded the plane? Check. Touchdown? Check. I’ve made it through the actual travel part of my trip. Yay! But after all that, I’ve still got a routine to follow, even though I’ve reached my destination.

This little cooler comes in handy when en route to a destination, but I always feel much better when I can get my insulin vials into an actual refrigerator.

It’s pretty straightforward, really. I simply need to determine where to keep my diabetes supplies for the duration of my stay. If I’m in a hotel room, I locate the mini fridge and stash my insulin vials  in there. I tend to keep everything else (pods, swabs, etc.) out of plain sight in order to avoid attracting attention from housekeeping. I mean, if I was going in and out of hotel rooms all day long and noticed that one contained a bag filled with needles, I’d probably get a little suspicious. So this means my other supplies live in my suitcase for the week, in an easily accessible pocket.

It’s easier if I’m going to be visiting with friends or family. I still find a fridge to home my insulin, but I worry less about “hiding” my supplies. I’m able to keep them in a spot that’s convenient for me, which helps make site changes throughout my trip a smoother process.

Speaking of site changes, I find them particularly annoying when I’m on vacation. It feels like I have to plan a day – or several days in a row – around the fact that I’ve got an upcoming site change. But planning is a part of T1D management, so I’ve come to accept that I need to be diligent with scheduling activities and meals around it.

Sometimes site changes are no big deal on a trip, other times they’re a whole event (like when my mom and I went to Disney and had to change our pods in the parks – going into a family bathroom to do it was not overly fun). And other, more seldom times, site changes are reminders of why it’s so important to pack extra supplies on a trip.

Case in point: My family and I went on a Caribbean cruise a few years ago. It was an amazing vacation, but also one that presented a few challenges regarding diabetes. I was spending a lot of time in the sun and on beaches, and that took a toll on my pods a couple of times. I had to rip off pods prematurely twice on this trip and replace them with my backups. Thank goodness I had thought to bring a pod for every single day of the vacation (seven days, seven pods) – because I wound up using five of them. So I never feel badly about obsessively packing tons of extra supplies that I might not necessarily use, because I never know when they’ll come in handy.

Travelbetes. It can be kinda complicated; hence, it requires its own word. But it’s worth it in the end, because my choice to travel independently with diabetes shows that it won’t stop me from seeing new places.

One thought on “Traveling with T1D: Upon Arrival

  1. lol I love the new word travelbetes. I have never flown but I did used to work for the railroad and on a traveling gang no less. That meant moving from town to town often plus going home each weekend/time off. Always make sure to have enough insulin as my prescription was at my home pharmacy, never used a national one like Walmart, CVS, or Walgreens. Make sure tor have enough test strips, sucks to run out with no source on the road. Most importantly making sure at least one person knows I’m diabetic. Might not do any good if they are afraid to speak up but you might be surprised how people open up when some else’s life is on the line. I’ve been following your adventure blog on traveling as a diabetic and found it interesting and informative. Even an old timer like me can learn something from you kids. lol I’ll stop now, I’m just making myself sound old at this point. Thumbs up.

    Liked by 1 person

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