First Impressions: How I Feel About my New Endocrinologist

Last week, I wrote about how I had an appointment with my first new endocrinologist in about 10 years. I compared my thoughts and feelings about the whole thing to a first date: Many of the same anxieties are felt in both situations.

By now, I’m sure you’re wondering…how did the date go?

Well…I don’t know that there will be another one.

Freedom is the atmosphere in which humanity thrives. Breathe it in.
This blog post serves as a bit of an endocrinologist evaluation.

Before I dive into my appointment postscript, let me just clarify that my thoughts and feelings are just that. They’re my opinions on how my experience was with this particular doctor. That doesn’t mean that she isn’t a great endocrinologist; in fact, I’m certain she is. But I just don’t think that we are doctor-patient soulmates.

For starters, the appointment got off to a weird start because none of my typical vital signs were measured upon arrival. I’m used to having my weight, blood pressure, blood sugar, temperature, and heart rate checked at the beginning of every appointment. But this time around, the only thing that was looked at was my…blood pressure? It was kind of random, and I never got an explanation as to why nothing else was looked at by the nurse, but whatever.

The actual appointment with the doctor herself mostly went as I expected it to. We spent about 20 minutes together (about 5 minutes longer than I usually get with the endo) and I told her a little bit about my diabetes history. She offered me some advice on what to do about the high blood sugars my new inhaler was causing (more on that in another post) and checked my feet as well as my thyroid, just like my previous endo did at every appointment. But she did not check my eyes, and she also…did not review my A1c with me.

This was pretty huge, though not totally unexpected. I knew this clinic didn’t have finger stick A1c machines like the previous clinic did, and that I would have to come to the lab at another point in time to get a current A1c reading. But it was surprising to me that she just glossed over it, like it wasn’t super important at that moment. She didn’t even review my Dexcom/OmniPod/Verio IQ meter graphs with me, despite having downloaded information from all three devices. However, these weren’t the most shocking parts of the appointment.

What caught me off-guard the most is when she said that I could come back in six months instead of my usual three.

In my 22 years with diabetes, I’ve gone to see my endocrinologist every three months, no matter what. Some of these appointments were more like maintenance checks to make sure I was on track with everything, but other appointments came at crucial times for me in terms of improving my diabetes management. I asked the new doc why six months instead of three, and she said something along the lines of…

“Well, it seems like you have everything under pretty good control. And you seem in-tune enough with your body to know to contact us with any questions.”

That latter statement is true, but the former…I don’t know about that. How could she have this impression after talking with me for a mere 20 minutes? It was mildly alarming. I probably could’ve pushed for another appointment in three months, but I got the distinct feeling that I would’ve been rejected had I done so. As a result, I walked out of the clinic that day with another appointment set for July and a feeling of unease settling in the pit of my stomach.

I don’t know that I can wait that long to see an endocrinologist, and I don’t even know if I’ll want to see the same person again. I have no idea how she’d be able to remember me, for goodness’ sake, especially given the brevity of our first and only meeting (so far).

Among all these unknowns, there’s one absolute truth: I miss my old endo.

An Abundance of Appointments

Ugh, I don’t know why I did this to myself, but about a year ago, I decided to schedule a bunch of my key doctors’ appointments back-to-back. That means every week for the next three weeks, I’ll be seeing one of my main doctors. Fun!!!

Truthfully, I don’t HATE going to see the doctor. It’s just the waiting and the feeling of being in a hospital-like environment that I detest. And I’ve gotta say, I’m not overly fond of my personal bubble being invaded for the sake of evaluating my wellness, but it is what it is.

First up on the calendar was a visit to the dentist. This is the only doctor I see who never asks about my diabetes, which is very refreshing. But that doesn’t mean diabetes is far from my mind when I go to get my teeth cleaned. My big fear is that my blood sugar will go low in the middle of the appointment, which would make things difficult seeing as I’d have to ask the dentist to stop what she’s doing and let me correct for the low. This would be super frustrating for both parties, as she’d probably have to start her work all over again and I’d have to wait for my blood sugar to go back up to normal.

Fortunately, this fear has yet to come to fruition and my blood sugar is usually fine, if not a little high, at the time of these appointments. And this trip to the dentist was likely one of the easier appointments I’ve got scheduled this month, because I was told my teeth look great. I was also told that my hair is awesome, which made me flash my pearly whites even bigger at the dentist. Yup, definitely the easiest (and CERTAINLY the most flattering?!) appointment I’ll have all month…possibly all year.

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The patient’s perspective.

Next up is my primary care doctor. It’s time for my annual physical. This appointment was basically a complete wash because it occurred within the hour of me fracturing my ulna (see a couple posts down). In between my tears, my doctor asked me standard questions and requested to me to fulfill the usual battery of annual lab tests. My blood pressure was a little high during the appointment, but if I had to make an educated guess, it’s probably because I was stressed due to the excruciating pain I was experiencing in my right arm. Just a hunch.

Thank goodness that everything else came back normally, though. Fewer things to worry about when it comes to my health will always be a welcome concept.

I don’t want to count appointment number three on this list, but I guess it’s worth mentioning my trip to the orthopedic’s office – you know, because of the broken bone. I get to have at least two more with him in the next six weeks as follow-ups. Joy!!!

Finally, the last truly pre-scheduled appointment I’ve got is with my endocrinologist. I’m nervous because I don’t know what my A1c will be like. I have an excellent and empathetic endocrinologist, so I know whether it’s good or bad, this reading won’t affect the overall tone of the appointment. It’s just pressure that I put on myself.

We’ll find out what happens before long. All I know for sure is that I’ll be relieved when I’m finally through with all these appointments.