Every Last Drop

27 units. That’s exactly how many units of Humalog were left in my pod, and I had no choice but to literally throw them away. My pod was expired – it had been for 8 hours – and to my knowledge, 8 hours after a pod expires, it will cease working entirely.

I kept the pod on those 8 extra hours because I couldn’t bear the thought of wasting insulin.

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27 units and no choice but to throw all of them away.

It’s a strange, messed up game that I played. I was taking a bit of a risk by wearing my pod for so long after it expired. After all, it’s just a piece of technology, and it can sometimes be difficult to know whether or not it’s working properly when it’s brand new, let alone within the window of expiration. But this is the game that I have to play, along with so many other people with diabetes, because insulin is precious.

Insulin keeps us alive.

Insulin is a need, not a want.

Insulin is exorbitantly expensive, so much so that it ranks #6 on a listing of the 10 most expensive liquids in the world.

With that in mind, tell me…would you feel comfortable throwing away even one single unit of it?

One could argue that maybe I could’ve tried to extract the 27 units from the old pod and reuse it in a new one – but to me, that’s an even more dangerous game to play. I have no clue whether that’s safe, or if there’s too much risk involved with germs and cross-contamination. Maybe I’m just paranoid, but when it comes to my health, I have to be.

So as much as it pained me to be unable to use every last drop of insulin, I made the only viable choice for me and disposed of 27 units of Humalog.

27 units, 16 units, 3 unit, 1 unit…no matter what the quantity is here, every last drop of insulin is invaluable.

When will we see change? Is it really too much to ask for insulin to be affordable to all?

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Metformin Update #1: Slow Start Comes to a Screeching Halt

A month ago, I wrote about how I was going to start taking an oral diabetes medication called Metformin. You can read all about what is is and why I started taking it by clicking here. (If you didn’t read that post when it was initially published, I recommend skimming it quickly before you continue reading this one…otherwise, what I have to say next might not make much sense.)

All caught up? Good. Now I can tell you that my first Metformin update isn’t much of one…because I’ve already stopped taking it (for now, anyways).

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For now, this vial of pills will remain mostly full.

After two weeks of taking one pill after dinner daily, I decided that I needed a break from my new diabetes therapy. There’s a lot going on in my life right now – I’m moving to a new state in a matter of days, so all my spare time is spent either packing or seeing my family and friends. Adding a new medication into the mix, one that can cause unpredictable blood sugars, just doesn’t make sense. And while it could be argued that I could make adjustments to my insulin dosages to help mitigate the number of lows I experience, I simply don’t have the patience to fiddle around with my insulin-to-carb ratios or basal rates at this time. It’s all too much change at once, and even though I’ve become much more comfortable with new things in my adulthood, I still need time to acclimate to them.

I explained all that, albeit much more succinctly, to my endocrinologist via my patient portal messaging system a few days ago. And she’s totally on board with my decision, thank goodness. I’m free to resume Metformin again when I’m ready.

The affirmation from my endo that I was doing the right thing feels great. It helps me feel more confident in making choices that benefit my body’s health as well as my mental health. Even though now doesn’t feel like a good time to be taking daily doses of Metformin, I know that won’t always be the case. Maybe, in time, it’ll become a crucial component of my diabetes care and management routine – maybe I’ll end up valuing it as much as my OmniPod or CGM. But for now, I’m okay with putting it off just a bit longer.