My RxSugar Review: All About the Allulose

Disclaimer: This post IS NOT sponsored by Stacey Simms or RxSugar. I am merely spreading the word about new products that I got to try because I won an Instagram giveaway. The following represents my honest review about the RxSugar products that I received ONLY and I am not being compensated in any way to write this blog post. Now that I have that off my chest, read on for my review!

Who doesn’t love free stuff???

Whether it’s SWAG (Stuff We All Get) or prizes in a raffle drawing, I’m a fan of free things. I’m the type of person who will enter contests once in awhile just to see if I’m lucky enough to win, and more often than not, I don’t win anything. (Insert sad emoji here.)

So imagine my surprise when I entered an Instagram giveaway and was actually announced as one of the winners!!! (Insert shocked emoji here!)

This particular giveaway was held in honor of one million downloads of Stacey Simms’ podcast, Diabetes Connections. She partnered with a handful of diabetes companies that graciously donated prizes as part of the giveaway. I had no idea which diabetes company’s products I’d receive, but I was just stoked to have won anything!

A few weeks after my winner announcement, I received a box in the mail from a company called RxSugar. I hadn’t heard of them before, so I did a quick search online. Turns out their shtick is production of “The World’s best tasting, healthiest plant-based sugar and syrups”, which boast zero calories, net carbs, and glycemic. Intrigued? So was I.

The secret ingredient to this sugar that makes it much more diabetes-friendly compared to the regular kind is that it’s made with allulose. In short, allulose is a natural, plant-based alternative to sugar with a chemical structure similar to fructose, the type of sugar that is found in fruit. If you’re curious to learn more about allulose, this article does a good job of explaining it and its benefits.

My little puppy Violet approves of RxSugar, too.

I digress – I bet you’re wanting to know what I actually got from RxSugar! They sent me their organic liquid sugar, pancake syrup, sample stick sugar packets (kind of like Splenda packets), and a canister of sugar that I could use for baking. I was really excited to try everything because 1) I have a wicked sweet tooth and 2) I love baking in my spare time.

In the last few weeks, I’ve tried everything except the canister of sugar (but it’s the same as what’s in the packets, I just haven’t baked anything with it). Here are my thoughts on the RxSugar products:

  • The syrup: HOLY WOW this stuff is incredible. This was by far my favorite thing that I received from RxSugar. My entire life, I’ve used low calorie or sugar-free syrup when enjoying waffles or pancakes. I know that a lot of people turn their noses up at sugar-free syrup and claim that it tastes like syrup-flavored water, but I never had a problem with it…’til I tried RxSugar’s syrup. It’s SWEET and tastes so much like maple that it’s hard to believe it’s not real maple syrup. I’ve had it on top of Kodiak cinnamon oat waffles and oooooooh, it was so good. I’m going to make this bottle last as long as possible, that’s how much I loved it.
  • The liquid sugar: I wasn’t sure how I was going to use the liquid sugar. I drink my coffee black and don’t really add anything to sweeten up my food. But then it hit me: I could add it to plain Greek yogurt, which is sometimes a little too tart for my liking (yet I still eat it because of the high protein content). I tried that first and liked it, though I may have a preference for adding honey to my Greek yogurt because it imparts an additional flavor, not just sweetness. I also added the liquid sugar to a smoothie I made containing Greek yougurt, frozen fruit, and almond milk, and it really did amp up the sweetness in just the right way.
  • The sample stick sugar packets: So I’ve tried these in a few different beverages and truthfully, I can’t really taste the sweetness. At all. I made my version of lemonade using one of these sugar packets and the lemon was for sure the dominating flavor. Maybe I should try adding two or three packets next time? Or maybe I can try adding it to coffee for old times’ sake (I used to take coffee with 2 creamers and 3 Splenda packets, yuck) for a hint of sweetness without the extra calories. I bet it’d taste good in flavored coffee. That’s an experiment for a day in the near future…*Update*: I received some clarification from the RxSugar team regarding the sample sticks! They are not-for-resale sample sticks that are only intended to be used as a quick tasting sample. In other words, they’re not an accurate serving size when used in beverages and the like. So that totally explains why I couldn’t taste the sweetness using a single stick!

Overall, I’m really glad I got the chance to try a variety of products from this company (that syrupppppp). Thanks for sending me everything, RxSugar, and shout-out to Stacey Simms for hosting the giveaway AND for a million podcast downloads!

Catch Me On “This is Type 1”, Episode 28!

Yesterday, episode 28 of This is Type 1 went live – and surprise, it’s the episode in which I was interviewed!

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My podcast promo shot and bio!

Click this link to give the episode a listen. And be sure to let me know your thoughts!

Here’s a little sneak peek of what Colleen and I discuss:

  • How “Hugging the Cactus”, the T1D blog, came to exist
  • My diabetes story – when I was diagnosed, etc.
  • How I define diabetes burnout (and how I deal with it)
  • My process for writing blog posts
  • My favorite posts so far
  • …and so much more!

So, now that I’ve piqued your interest…listen to the episode! I hope you enjoy it. A special shout-out to Colleen and her co-host, Jessie (who unfortunately wasn’t available when we recorded the episode) – thank you BOTH for your time. I appreciate your contributions to diabetes advocacy and the diabetes online community, and I know many, many others appreciate it, too!

Overcoming Fears and Feeling All the Feels at FFL Falls Church 2019

I wasn’t sure what I was doing here.

“Here” meaning the CWD Friends for Life conference that took place in Falls Church, Virginia, this past weekend. CWD/FFL are acronyms synonymous with some of the largest, best-known conferences for people with diabetes and their families. I went to my first in Orlando back in 2013, and it resulted in me craving more chances to spend time with large groups of T1Ds.

However, timing and money prevented me from going to as many conferences as I’d like in the last few years. I did go to one back in 2017, but it wasn’t what I’d hoped it would be…so going into FFL Falls Church 2019, I was simultaneously excited and nervous.

My fears and anxieties hit their peak within minutes of me arriving to the hotel that was hosting the conference.

All around me, I was witnessing mini reunions taking place. It seemed like everyone in attendance knew each other, and the introvert within me was totally freaking out – how could I possibly join these preformed friendships?

I left that first night feeling a little deflated. I’d only managed to speak to a couple of people who weren’t exhibiting vendors, and I’d spent entirely too much time looking busy on my cell phone when in reality I was just hoping someone might come up and talk to me. It was a little pathetic, but I knew I’d go back the next day having learned from my mistakes.

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Wearing the signature neon green bracelet (which denotes that I have T1D to other conference attendees – the other bracelet color is orange and that means you do not have T1D).

Day 2 rolled around and as I moved from session to session, I slowly started coming out my shell. I met and spoke with parents of T1D children of all ages. I heard a wide variety of diagnosis stories and experiences. I forced myself out of my comfort zone even more by attending a session that focused on diabetes and complications, which I normally can’t stand thinking about, but I actually found it to be one of the best sessions of the entire conference. It’s amazing how much people can open up to a room of what started out as strangers but quickly turned into friends and confidants.

By the third and final day of the conference, my diabetes soul was feeling rejuvenated. It’s pretty difficult to put into words, but being surrounded by so many people with T1D (and those who care for them) for a full weekend is unlike anything else. You’re around people who understand everything about diabetes. They know what a low blood sugar feels like. They know that 4 beeps emitting from an OmniPod is no big deal because it’s just a 4-hour expiration alert. They know how to carb count better than most doctors. They know what burnout is.

It’s just really magical.

In the end, I’m incredibly glad I went to the conference. I met people I might not have ever had the chance to meet. I learned quite a bit about some new diabetes technologies and medicines (more to come on those later). I had open and honest conversations about nearly every aspect of diabetes, which made me feel less alone. I left feeling happy, better informed, more connected, and most of all, proud of myself for overcoming my fears and attending the conference on my own.

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My happy face at the end of the conference.

 

Diabetes Connections: Gym Edition

“Are you a diabetic?” Despite the fact that I was wearing earbuds, I heard the question that was undoubtedly being directed toward me.

I glanced to my right and met the gaze of the teenage girl on the treadmill next to me. I smiled, tugging an earbud out, and said, “Yes, I am. My OmniPod gave it away, didn’t it?”

She nodded eagerly. “I have a Medtronic pump, but I know what an OmniPod looks like. When I saw it, I had to say something to you.”

This marked the beginning of what wound up being a thirty minute interaction with Shae, a high school senior with bucketloads of energy and questions for me about life with diabetes. We specifically chatted about college, and I couldn’t resist telling her all about the College Diabetes Network and what a useful tool it was for me during my three and a half years at UMass. The more we spoke, the more it felt like I was looking at a mirror image of myself from seven years ago. She had just finished taking her AP Psych exam and was relieved it was done. Her senior prom was in a few days, and she described how she’d wear her pump while donning her fancy gown. She was excited about college, but a little nervous about the dreaded “Freshman 15” and whether her diabetes would adjust well to college dining halls.

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It’s so funny to think how something as crappy as diabetes can introduce so many amazing people into your life.

I did my best to answer Shae’s rapid-fire questions frankly but reassuringly. As I told her about how much my CGM helped me in college (especially since I was still on multiple daily injection therapy at that time), she exclaimed that I was inspiring her to want to give her CGM another shot (pun unintended – I love spontaneous diabetes humor).

As we parted ways, we both grinned broadly and wished one another well. This is why moments like this – diabetes in the wild – are so great. Diabetes instantly bonds you to a stranger who you might not otherwise ever interact with, and the beauty in that immediate connection is priceless.