Sensor Snapping by the Seashore

Sensor snapping by the seashore…try saying that five times fast.

The past several weeks have been so busy that I completely forgot about an incident that occurred when I was away on vacation in July.

An incident that I’d never experienced in my decade of using Dexcom CGMs…

It was the second-to-last day of my trip. I was blissfully soaking up the sun’s rays – it was by far the best beach day of my entire week in Maine. That meant that the sun was strong that day…so strong that I was basically applying sunscreen every hour, on the hour, because I am as pale as Casper the friendly ghost.

During one of my sunscreen applications, I noticed that the Dexcom sensor on the back of my arm was looking a little off. I mean that literally – the transmitter seemed like it was jutting out at a weird angle. Upon further inspection, I realized that the grayish-purple prong that helps keep the transmitter in place was hanging on by a thread. I was pretty surprised to make that discovery, for a few reasons: 1) I didn’t know that could happen, 2) the sensor was only about 24 hours old and nothing went awry during the application process, and 3) I couldn’t remember bumping into anything that would’ve caused a plastic piece to break off my sensor. But the most surprising part was that it was enough to cause my sensor to stop collecting readings altogether – I was getting an error message on my Dexcom app.

My broken sensor prongs and me, sitting on the beach.

I didn’t know what to do other than carefully break the prongs off all the way – they weren’t going to do me any good now – and gingerly press my transmitter down into my sensor for several minutes to see if that did anything…and no dice. I resorted to plan B, which was to wait until I got back to the house I was staying at to do some more research into the matter.

Unfortunately, the internet had nothing helpful to offer me. I was somewhat relieved to know that this has happened to other people, but definitely bummed to learn that there wasn’t a real solution other than to apply a new sensor – which wasn’t an option for me since I had only packed the one sensor for my trip. Whoops. So much for me being the diligent, prepared T1D that I thought I was.

Ultimately, I decided to rip the sensor off and deal with finger stick checks for the rest of my trip; after all, I was going to be returning home the next day. I look at the whole incident as yet another example of why it’s important to pack extras of my extras, and as a reminder to expect the unexpected in life with diabetes!

CGM Sensor Adhesive: Not as Sticky as It Used to Be

I’ve had four CGM sensors fall off in the last six weeks or so.

Four! And they’ve all been in different locations, too – both the left and the right sides of my thighs and my stomach. I’ve worn overlay patches – at times multiple – to help keep them on, and I’ve still dealt with adhesive that just doesn’t want to lay flat against my skin.

What gives? I can’t recall a time in which I’ve had worse luck with my CGM sensors staying stuck.

I’ve gone through quite a few overlay patches in the last few weeks in an attempt to get my CGM sensors to stay stuck on my skin…with mixed success.

Normally, I’d blame it on weather, but it hasn’t exactly been warm here in New England yet. Temps have mainly stayed in the 50s and 60s, so it’s not like I can pinpoint the problem on heat.

The only silver lining in this scenario is that Dexcom does have a nice replacement program. They make it really easy to submit a patient support request online that goes straight to Dexcom support for processing. Filling this form out takes me no more than five minutes and by doing so, I’ve received a replacement sensor for each one that’s fallen off in the last month and a half. And while I was starting to worry that I was submitting too many requests, Dexcom hasn’t further inquired me on the matter yet, so I feel a little better knowing that I can count on them to give me replacements for sensors that won’t stay stuck.

Until the adhesive improves, though, it looks like I’m stuck wearing at least two or more overlay patches on my sensors to ensure their 10-day lifespans.

I guess they just don’t make ’em like they used to…

Do Dexcom G6 Readings Become Less Accurate as Transmitters Age?

In my unofficial opinion: Yes, Dexcom G6 transmitters lose accuracy as they approach their expiration dates. And I’m not quite sure if I’m the only one who has noticed this, or if others have also experienced this frustrating phenomenon.

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In my unprofessional opinion, yes!

I’m writing this after dealing with a dying transmitter that was showing its signs of decay by 1) losing connectivity with my receiver and 2) reporting inaccurate blood sugar readings. I’ve definitely narrowed the problem down to my aging transmitter, which (allegedly) had one session left before it was set to expire – everything else about this particular sensor session was standard procedure. And guess what else, everything about the entire 10-day session was obnoxious, because it was rare for me to have a single day with both accurate and consistent readings. Ugh!!!

I don’t know what’s more irritating – the signal loss or the inaccuracies. Actually, I DO know what irritates me more than anything else, and that’s the fact that the transmitters don’t seem to last for as long as they’re advertised. It’s just ludicrous, especially when you take into account how much these devices cost.

Many people with diabetes rely on this, and other forms of technology, to effectively manage diabetes. And when the technology can’t be relied on to do its job, we can’t perform our jobs as well. Diabetes is draining enough – is it too much to ask for technology to be trustworthy?