The DOC: The 24/7 Support System I Never Knew that I Needed

I’ve lauded the DOC (Diabetes Online Community) time and time again for connecting me with individuals globally who are also affected by type one diabetes. And I don’t foresee an end to my desire to express gratitude for this amazing community, because over and over, members of it continue to blow me away with their words of encouragement and gestures of friendship.

My latest wave of gratefulness was spurred when I arrived home from work on Monday to a cheerful, Tiffany-blue envelope waiting patiently for me to open it. It was a delightful little package from my friend Sarah, who I “met” via Instagram over the summer. Besides diabetes, we share common interests in fitness, wellness, our pet dogs, and bright colors, among other things.

Sarah went out of her way to mail me a few goodies (shown in the picture), including a cute T1D key chain and an adorable cactus card with a message of support written inside. I was incredibly, pleasantly surprised by all of it. It wasn’t about the material items for me (though they are totally my style, and I can’t wait to make use of them). It was more so how she took the time to put it all together for me, cleverly incorporating some of the things that introduced us to one another in the first place, that really blew me away.

57D80F3D-2B6D-4B8D-9027-41219C9DFD0B
Sweet trinkets from a sweet friend!

It got me thinking about the larger diabetes community I’ve met and harvested friendships with in the last several years. And as hard as it is for me to properly describe the level of richness, knowledge, and support that those friendships have given to me, it’s beyond easy for me to say that I am infinitely thankful for all of them, and I hope that in return, I am able to offer at least a fraction of the same to others.

With all that said, it’s even more mind-blowing to me that I resisted this community for such a long time. For the first 14 years or so that I lived with diabetes, I rejected the notion that I needed peer support to help me manage the emotional and physical aspects of diabetes. I turned down offers to go to diabetes camp. I didn’t interact with the only two other diabetics in my school’s district because I feared social isolation. In some situations, I even pretended that I didn’t have diabetes, because my yearning to be normal like everyone else overpowered my need to make my health a priority.

That’s why I don’t think it’s a coincidence that things started to turn around when I met other T1Ds my age. That marked the point where I could have open, honest conversations with others who were going through similar life events at the same time as me, without the judgments or criticisms I may have had to endure if I had those same conversations with family or doctors. While I know that I need to give myself and my personal growth some credit for improving how I manage my diabetes, I would be remiss if I did not also attribute some of that credit to the members of the DOC who have made meaningful contributions to my life and my outlook on it.

It’s funny that something special in the mail made me contemplate all of this, but Sarah’s thoughtful package to me is a tangible representation of how connections within the DOC have changed me for the better.

Thank you, Sarah, and another big thank you to those of you in the DOC that I have met, as well as those I have yet to meet.

Advertisements

T1D, the Common Denominator

I know a lot of people who have type 1 diabetes. And I consider many of them friends of mine.

You know what’s so cool about that? It’s that diabetes was merely the common denominator, something that we knew we shared, but not the sole reason for friendship. Diabetes provides a launching point into which we can find other shared interests: from TV shows to travel destination wish lists, the conversations we have don’t often linger on diabetes. But even when they do, it’s nice to talk about anything-and-everything diabetes with people who speak the same T1D vernacular.

77521CF5-A5CE-4103-9BE3-A4DA1DB4881C
I’d met half of these people prior to this event, and I became fast friends with the other half, thanks to our common denominator: diabetes.

Case in point: An end-of-summer pool party I attended a few weeks ago that introduced me to a handful of T1Ds. Sure, we started off talking about things like medical research experiences and CGM trials, but then we moved on to the other topics we cared about and really got to know each other. It proved to me, for the umpteenth time, that it’s just so dang special that something as shitty as diabetes can bring so many good things into my life, including friendships with some marvelous human beings.