Not 1, But 2 New Blood Sugar Meters: How I Got ‘Em and Why I Need ‘Em

Unexpectedly, I just obtained two brand-new blood sugar meters.

I’ve been a fairly loyal user of my OneTouch Verio IQ meter for about a decade now – that’s a longer relationship than the one I’ve had with Dexcom or OmniPod. It’s been mostly a loving relationship: From the beginning, I was a big fan of its sleek design, back-lit screen, and overall portability/usability. It grew a little more tumultuous over the years, though, as I noticed occasional, unprompted system shutdowns and questioned the overall accuracy of the device.

So I decided it was time to explore other options.

I brought this up to my endocrinologist during my very brief appointment with her a few weeks ago, and she let me know that a new Verio meter would be available soon. She said that she would set one aside for me when she received the shipments and that I could come and pick it up whenever I was back at the clinic.

Coincidentally, my gynecologist’s office is just down the hall from my endo, so I was able to pull double duty the other day and pick up the new meter right after my annual appointment with the lady doctor!

I was super excited to have a new meter, and even happier that it would take the same strips as my old meter. But there was one problem that I discovered when I got home…

…the meter I received isn’t the fancy-schmancy one just released by OneTouch.

Not 1, But 2 New Blood Sugar Meters_ How I Got 'Em and Why I Need 'Em
My old Verio IQ (left) with my new Verio Flex (right)

Instead, it was a generation after my Verio IQ – so it’s still a new one – though it’s decidedly less impressive, technology-wise, compared to its counterpart. It’s the OneTouch Verio Flex, and it’s very compact, but lacking a charging port (it runs on a battery) and the back-light that I loved so much about my Verio IQ.

Before I could fret too much about this minor disappointment – I can’t get too upset over a meter that I didn’t have to pay for – I noticed a letter on the counter addressed to me from my company.

I opened it up and was pleased to discover that my company is partnering with Livongo to offer a free blood glucose testing kit, free lancets/strips, and free coaching to all qualified associates with diabetes.

Talk about a sick benefit, right?!

I followed the instructions enclosed with the letter and within five minutes, my information was submitted to the Livongo website and my kit was on its way to me.

I’m totally pumped about this meter and this new program that my company set up. I’ve never heard of them doing anything like this before, and it will be a huge relief to know that I won’t have to worry about ordering blood sugar testing strips (or the associated cost) any time soon. But the meter itself sounds so dang cool, too – it has a full-color touchscreen! The meter actually knows when you’re running out of test strips and will remind you to reorder them!!! I’ve never heard of anything like that before, so I’m eagerly awaiting its arrival and can’t wait to check out all the features.

The one thing you might be wondering about these two new meters is…why the heck would I need them since I already have a Dexcom G6 that monitors my blood sugars 24/7???

There are two reasons: It never hurts to have back-ups and my Dexcom isn’t always accurate.

Let’s say that tomorrow, my Dexcom transmitter fails. Suddenly, I’d be without any blood sugar readings and I’d have to rely solely on my meters for blood sugar checks. That’s why it’s incredibly important to have functioning meters at all times, because you just never know when you may have no choice but to use them.

To compound that, my Dexcom doesn’t always work the way it should. Sometimes, I receive sensor errors and it doesn’t work properly for hours. Other times, I feel symptomatic of low or high blood sugars and my Dexcom doesn’t report them, so I resort to doing a finger stick check to verify the accuracy of my Dexcom’s readings.

It’s easy to understand, then, why I think it’s crucial to have at least one spare blood sugar meter. I may have come across these two new ones suddenly and fortuitously, but I welcome their addition to my diabetes toolkit and can’t wait to “test” ’em out (and of course, blog about ’em).

 

The Expired Test Strip Experiment

Nearly every diabetes supply I own comes with an expiration date. Insulin vials, pods, ketones testing strips, and Dexcom sensor/transmitters are among the items that I’m always closely monitoring to ensure they’re still fresh and usable, but test strips? They’re basically the last thing that I worry about.

So I was curious when I recently noticed that my current test strip vial has an expiration date of 12/31/19. Would these strips still measure my blood sugar accurately, or was the New Year’s Eve expiration hard and fast?

I wanted to find out.

The Expired Test Strip Experiment
An introductory blog post to a potentially ongoing experiment.

My experiment design was rudimentary: I’d simply continue to use the 12/31/19 test strips until the vial was empty. I’d check any blood sugar results that I was unsure about against my Dexcom readings, and in cases that I deemed necessary, I’d use test strips with a far-off expiration (July 2020) to see how they matched up with the expired strips.

To my slight surprise, though it’s only been about a week since the old strips expired, it doesn’t seem to affect things much at all. They’re just as accurate as newer strips and my Dexcom.

In fact, in many cases, the old strips were only off (according to my measurements) by no more than 9 points. Not bad. I’ve had a wider spread in results between strips from the exact same vial, so the fact that the old strips were so close to new ones was interesting to me. And four days after the strips expired, I checked my blood sugar (I was 263) and used a new strip to double check that (it read 262). A single point difference is pretty impressive.

So now I know that I’m safe if I use test strips a week after they’ve expired…which is great! But now I’m sort of curious to see just how far out from the expiration date I can use them. I might hang onto this vial of test strips for a few more weeks and continue to test them against newer test strips. I might not (because really, when it comes to diabetes, there are just more important things to be worried about…and I might not want to push my luck and end up wasting strips). We’ll see what I end up doing.

I think that the more compelling questions to stem from this experiment are 1) how many other diabetes supplies are safe (up to a certain limit) to use after expiring and 2) why are supplies labeled with expiration dates if, in the grand scheme of things, they seem to function just fine after expiring? Could it just be a nasty trick played on people with diabetes by prescription drug companies…?

Those are the kinds of questions that really make me wonder.