What My Dog Thinks About My Diabetes

The other day, I decided to ask my puppy, Violet, what she thinks about my diabetes…

…and she just stared at me, nonplussed, because obviously she’s a dog and she can’t respond to me with anything other than tail wags, barks, or playful growls.

Violet’s expression when I asked her about my diabetes.

But really, I’ve been thinking about how much she notices my diabetes. I know that she sees my devices from time to time – and sheer curiosity causes her to poke and prod them with her nose in what I perceive to be an attempt to dislodge them from my body.

I know that she wakes up in the middle of the night when I’m experiencing a low blood sugar and have to come downstairs to correct it.

I know she watches me during every pod change, gazing up and tilting her head from side to side whenever my PDM beeps throughout the process.

I know that she gets excited when I get a box of insulin or Dexcom sensors in the mail – she’s right by my side, jumping up and down as I tear into the packages, thinking that it might be a special delivery for her.

I know she waits patiently when I have to pay more attention to my diabetes in a given moment than I can pay to her.

It’s just interesting to bunch all of these moments together and mull over the fact that she is definitely aware of my diabetes, though her understanding of what it is and why it takes up so much of my time is just as likely to be something she’s not aware of.

For her, it’s blissful ignorance.

For me, it’s blissful knowledge that my dog is seemingly patient and understanding when it comes to all diabetes matters.

I’m lucky to have her.

How Raising a Puppy is Similar to Dealing with Diabetes, Part 2

Just about three years ago, I was helping my parents raise their puppy, Clarence. And naturally, with me being who I am, I found that raising him was a lot like dealing with diabetes – and wrote about it in this blog post.

Now that I’m a puppy parent, I revisited that post and found that there are even more similarities between the two.

For starters, one of the biggest parts of diabetes management is the constant monitoring involved in it. As it turns out, the same can be said about raising a puppy! Much like my blood sugar, I am watching her like a hawk during all waking hours. I’m prepared to pounce on her if she’s chewing up a puppy pad or squatting down to her business indoors, just like I’m prepared to act when my blood sugar is going higher or lower than I’d like.

Raising a puppy is only this cute and sweet about 2% of the time. (Okay, total exaggeration here, but I’m writing this after Violet decided to do her business in her playpen just after I had her outside.)

Also, as it turns out – shocker – having a puppy around is exhausting. My sleep has been interrupted several times over the last few weeks by Violet’s whimpers. Before, I used to only have to worry about a Dexcom alarm waking me in the middle of the night, but now I have to respond to her cries, too. Fortunately, having a puppy isn’t totally like having diabetes in this regard, because at least I can nap when she’s napping! (We all know that diabetes never sleeps…)

Another similarity, one that I don’t mind so much, is the frequent exercise that Violet needs. Just like my diabetes tends to be “better controlled” when I exercise each day, Violet also responds really well to playtime. The best part is that after a nice, long session of fetch or tug-of-war, she tends to zonk out afterwards, which I see as the puppy equivalent of having the coveted 100 mg/dL blood sugar.

However, there are tons of obvious differences between raising a puppy and managing diabetes. But the best, perhaps biggest one of all? Violet improves (well, when she doesn’t have an accident indoors) my overall mood and mental health. I know that her ability to do this will only increase over time as she matures. And I know that having her around will help me through the tough diabetes days that I’m bound to face in the future, and for that and so much more, I’m thankful for my little pup.